When Things Aren’t as They Seem (Non-Obvious Disability and Employment)

Katie, a potential employee, interviews with your company.  She is well qualified to perform the essential functions of the job for which she has applied.  The new employee is a wheelchair user; therefore, you recognize that some reasonable accommodations should made to ensure equality in the work environment.  You gladly work with the new employee, as you would any employee, because you want her to be successful in her position.  What about employees or potential employees who may have a non-obvious disability?  According to the Census Bureau’s Survey of Income and Program Participation, only 26% of people who have a significant disability that limits one or more major life areas use a mobility device, a common indicator of disability.  Use of mobility equipment alone cannot be a predictor of disability.

As Employers, we must be mindful of the employee who may have a non-obvious disability.  According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, one in five people in the United States will experience mental illness.  Depression is the most commonly experienced mental illness and is the leading cause of disability worldwide.  Additionally, 18% of the US population live with anxiety disorders.  Moreover, arthritis continues to be the leading cause of disability in the US.  Nearly 23% of our population cope with arthritis and the serious impact it has on their quality of life.  According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), nearly 66% of working age adults have arthritis and 8 million working age adults report that their ability to work is compromised by arthritis.  The CDC reports nearly half of our population experience chronic illness.  These include cancer, stroke, heart disease, and diabetes.  As the population of the US ages and medical advances allow people with non-obvious disabilities to live longer, the need for workplace accommodations will grow. Continue reading

11 Tips for Highly Effective Meetings

Unorganized meetings are the worst!

Everyone has been in a meeting that seems to never end, nothing is accomplished and you walk away wondering why you were even invited in the first place or why couldn’t this have been covered in an email … you are not alone!

Meetings, in the workplace, are necessary for exchanging opinions, ideas and collaborating to move projects forward or improve what already exists. Employees should feed excited about participating and contributing to their professional growth and the betterment of their company.

Organizations need to set expectations, so that a positive, constructive and professional experience is had by all employees. All it takes is a little preparation. Continue reading

How Will a Trump Presidency Impact Pay Equity?

As the dust settles from the 2016 election, predictions abound regarding what a Trump presidency will mean for employers.  Predicting what policy changes an administration will make is difficult after a typical election year . . . and Donald Trump’s successful campaign was anything but typical.  One issue employers may be concerned about is what is going to happen to the new EEO-1 reporting rule that requires employers with 100 or more employees to annually submit detailed pay data and work hours—in addition to race and gender data—for all employees beginning in 2018.

Unfortunately, it’s not clear.  President-elect Trump campaigned on a promise to (among other things) relieve businesses of unduly burdensome regulations enacted during President Obama’s Administration.  Therefore, the EEO-1 pay data reporting requirements may be one of the rules on the chopping block. Continue reading

After the AAP

How to Properly Implement the Affirmative Action Plan  – OutSolve’s newest presentation will help managers remove the grey areas of Affirmative Action Plan (AAP) implementation.

Here at OutSolve we support contractors throughout the country in Affirmative Action Planning, OFCCP audits and all things relate to EEO/AA compliance. Our primary interest is in AAP support, meaning every day we work with data, generate reports and answer hundreds of questions related to compliance. One important lesson we have learned over the years is that while many plan requirements are clear and well documented, not all aspects of compliance are so straightforward. Affirmative action planning can be as much an art as it is a science. It is often these grey areas that require the most support so OutSolve created a presentation to help federal contractors understand the requirements surrounding training and affirmative action plan implementation. Continue reading

“Should I Disclose my Disability During a Job Search?”

Employers and job seekers are often unclear as to their rights and responsibilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Some employers look upon the ADA with a little fear –- fear of litigation, fear that accommodating someone with a disability costs too much money, or fear that accommodations will mean more work for the employer or their staff. Perhaps the biggest misconception is that the ADA is a law for “those people”. In reality, the ADA is for all of us. According to the Social Security Administration, one in four of today’s twenty-year olds will become disabled before they retire. The ADA is a landmark civil rights law that provides for equal treatment of all people with a disability.

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Disability Recruitment- Some Tips

As a federal contractor, you have specific responsibilities related to the employment of individuals with disabilities. As per the amended Section 503 of The Rehabilitation Act, the goal for disability hiring is 7% across all job groups.

Preparation is key and there are steps you can take in advance. Here are some guidelines to help you prepare:

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